Inpatient Rehab: Everything You Need to Know

Inpatient Rehab: Everything You Need to Know

An Introduction to Addiction

Addiction is a disease that affects the brain. An addict has an intense focus, also known as an obsession, with a substance. The brain doesn’t care if there are negative consequences to the actions of doing drugs or consuming alcohol. This is why society generally views addicts as people who lack self-control but unfortunately, addiction runs much deeper than that. After all, if overcoming addiction was just a matter of teaching self-control, don’t you think there would be a lot fewer drug addicts in the world?

At All American Detox, we know how torturous and devastating addiction can be. We know that no one chooses to be an addict. No one actively chooses to lie to family and friends about their behavior, feel like they have no purpose in life other than getting high, and become in dire financial stress.  

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We’re dedicated to helping anyone we can who is battling addiction. We know every addict deserves the opportunity to get their life back. Today we’d like to discuss the many benefits of residential inpatient rehab and how it can help you overcome your addiction for good. 

Residential Inpatient Treatment Explained

Since addiction is a disease that looks a little different for everyone, there are multiple treatment options. Inpatient treatment is proven to be one of the more successful routes. During inpatient treatment, our clients remove themselves from their normal surroundings so they can focus 100% on recovery. This is one of the most responsible things an addict can do for themselves. This is one of the few instances in their lives where they can and should put themselves first.

Upon checking into inpatient, our clients undergo a comprehensive evaluation to determine the right course of treatment for them. Then, depending on what substance you’re addicted to, you’ll go through detoxification. During this time, your body will get rid of all of its toxins. It can be extremely dangerous to try to detox on your own, we strongly recommend doing this at a treatment facility. At All American Detox Center, we will make you as comfortable as possible during this process. We will also monitor your vitals constantly to make sure you aren’t experiencing any serious health conditions as a side effect of withdrawing. 

After detox, you will progress to inpatient treatment. You’ll live at our facility while attending various addiction treatment therapies. Depending on the course of treatment determined for you upon arrival, you’ll participate in individual and group therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectic behavioral therapy, family therapy, and more. You’ll learn how to live a substance-free life with different coping skills and tools taught during therapy.

Benefits of Inpatient Drug Treatment

benefits of inpatient rehab

  • Support of others: One of the biggest benefits of going to an inpatient treatment center is having the support of others. Getting sober can be intimidating because of the unknown. During inpatient, you’ll be surrounded by other people experiencing the same thing as you which can be really comforting. You’ll also be surrounded by addiction specialists 24/7 in case you have any questions or need anything.
  • Focus: During this time you can focus 100% on treatment! You don’t have to worry about cooking your own meals, work, and other everyday stressors. 
  • Access to different therapies: Most people struggle to get better from addiction or any kind of mental illness because they don’t have access to the right help. During inpatient treatment, you’ll have multiple kinds of therapies to see which is the best fit for you.  

How to Get Help

If you or someone you love is struggling with addiction, don’t wait to get help. The first step to seeking treatment is making the phone call. You can call our admissions line to get all of the answers to your questions. We’ll also go over insurance information and then coordinate the little details like transportation to our facility. 

Let Us Help!

At All American Detox, we are a compassionate residential inpatient drug rehab. Our professionals provide detox, residential inpatient, outpatient, and aftercare treatment for addiction. This comprehensive program is designed to work with individuals recovering from addiction from start to finish. Our programs blend traditional treatment techniques and modern therapies, tailoring our plans to meet the individual needs of our clients. Call us today to learn more about how we can help you with drug abuse and alcoholism!

How to Prepare for a Stay in Rehab for Alcohol?

How to prepare for a stay in rehab for alcohol - All American Detox

Deciding to get treatment for alcohol addiction is an important first step on the road to recovery, but the planning needed to enter rehabilitation requires special care.

If you are just starting on your recovery journey it is important to educate yourself on the best practices for preparing your stay in rehab for alcohol and other drugs. This includes things like how to settle your affairs with family and you employer as well as how to make use of insurance and paid leave, how to pack, and how to emotionally prepare for rehab.

Planning for addiction treatment

Step 1: Talk to Your Family

Rehabilitation programs can last anywhere from 1-3 months and in that time, you will have little to no contact with the outside world. If you have important roles in your household such as being the primary breadwinner or taking care of children or an elderly parent, it’s important to make sure that your loved ones have everything they need both to survive and to keep your keep up any household responsibilities in your absence.

Here are some additional things you may want to think about before leaving for rehab.1

  1. Assigning someone to pay the bills
  2. Having your mail picked up or forwarded
  3. Securing childcare for your children
  4. Making sure pets will be taken care of

When you feel confident that all your bases are covered at home it will be easier to get into the recovery mindset once you enter treatment.

Step 2: Tell Your Employer

Many understandably have concerns about telling their employer about a substance abuse issue but in most cases, the potential benefits outweigh the risks. If your employer is understanding, they will see your desire for treatment as positive even valuable to the interest of the company.

Telling your employer will also help you to secure vacation time off, sick leave and FMLA (unpaid leave which provides you with 12 weeks of federally protected leave). You will also still retain your medical benefits which will be important for covering the expenses of your stay in a recovery facility as well as any additional aftercare treatment you may need.1,2

Step 3: Packing Your Bags

Rehab centers are secure and isolated facilities. This provides clients with the proper atmosphere to remove themselves from the stressors of daily life to work on their sobriety. Because of this, there are strict rules about what can be brought with you.

For security reasons, there may be items that are absolutely prohibited such as cellphones, laptops or any device that can be connected to the internet as well as clothing that has profane messaging or drug references. Some items like cigarettes, mp3 players or handheld games may be allowed at certain rehab centers but not others.

Just as important as following the guidelines, is packing for the experience. Before going to an unfamiliar place, it is not uncommon to overpack, but you should stick to essentials and make considerations for your environment.

For example, if you are share close quarters with others and you know that there will be on-site laundry facilities you won’t need to pack two or more weeks’ worth of clothes. You also shouldn’t bring clothing that is stiff or uncomfortable.

Instead opt to bring clothing that is cozy attire such as sweaters, sweatpants t-shirts and comfortable footwear. When drug withdrawals kick in, you will be thankful to have them.

It’s also important to note that once you are admitted into rehab, you will have few (if any) opportunities to leave the premises of the recovery center, so it is important to pack smart and come prepared.

Other important items to pack for rehab include the following:3

  • Toiletries (deodorant, shaving razors, a toothbrush, hairbrush, toothpaste, hair care products, soap, and shampoo
  • Athletic clothes
  • Comfortable clothes, socks, and underwear
  • Mp3, CD player or a handheld game that can’t connect to the internet
  • A journal to write in
  • A few good books
  • Insurance card and prescription information

Step 4: Be Ready to Make Connections

The friendships you make while in rehab are crucial to maintaining long-term sobriety. These social support networks are comprised of peers who provide understanding, inspiration and are there to helping in your time of need. Building these relationships is an intentional part of your rehab program and without it you will not get the full benefits or residential inpatient care.

Step 5: Immerse yourself in the experience

Depending on your situation, your reservations about attending rehab. Feeling of guilt or skepticism or worries about leaving family behind are a natural part of things but they shouldn’t stop you from making the most of your time in treatment.

For one many quality rehab facilities have amenities like social areas, gyms, basketball nets or tennis courts that you can utilize in your free time. Some alcohol rehab centers offer holistic treatments like art therapy, equine therapy, yoga and meditation and all of them offer some form of counseling to help you learn more about why you use and how you can best put that knowledge to use while in recovery.

Get prepared mentally

Instead of seeing rehab as an experience that is forced upon you, think of it as an opportunity for self-improvement. So seldomly in life do we get the time to work on ourselves free from the distractions and stressors of the outside world–and there is plenty to learn to learn and do while in rehab.

Having a growth mindset in recovery means believing in your ability as a person to change. Just as alcohol addiction is forged by years of bad habits and poor decisions, so too is it possible to unlearn bad habits and win back your self-control and clarity of mind.

Get Help at All American Detox Center

Are you finally ready to quit drugs and alcohol once and for all?

All American Detox is a drug and alcohol treatment and rehab center located in Los Angeles California. Our detox and residential inpatient programs can help you overcome substance abuse in comfort and with confidence. For more information, call us today at (844) 570-1301.

Also Read: How to deal with depression and anxiety

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Conclusion

Preparing to stay in rehab for alcohol addiction, far from being simple will test your dedication to getting well. There are many moving parts that will need to be handled with due care and consideration such as coordinating with your employer and insurance, setting aside the time and preparing your family for your inevitable departure.

In the days leading up to enrollment you will also need to pack a bag and mentally prepare yourself for the experiences that wait you in alcohol rehab.

Citations

Before rehab, how to prepare. Help.org. (2022, May 25). Retrieved September 17, 2022, from https://www.help.org/preparing-for-rehab/

Family and medical leave (FMLA). United States Department of Labor. (n.d.). Retrieved September 17, 2022, from https://www.dol.gov/general/topic/benefits-leave/fmla

What to pack for inpatient rehabilitation. UPMC HealthBeat. (2022, April 7). Retrieved September 17, 2022, from https://share.upmc.com/2017/03/packing-for-inpatient-rehab/

10 Points You Should Know About PTSD Therapy

ptsd

As the saying goes, “time heals all things,” but in some cases, the side effects of these traumas can persist leading to long term mental suffering also called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD.

Understanding Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) 

Being party to an earth-shattering event or a string of deeply stressful events, can live with us far beyond the event itself. The scars that are left behind is what is known as psychological trauma.

PTSD can occur due to a wide variety of circumstances such as, being in combat, living through a natural disaster, situations of sexual abuse or domestic violence.

Other times, it can occur after hearing details of a deeply disturbing event such as murder or torture. This is especially true if this occurs to somebody that the person is close to.

When a person has PTSD, they relive their trauma through nightmares and intrusive thoughts. They may also self-isolate and become distrustful of others and the world at large. PTSD can also lead to feelings of low self-worth, anger, anxiety and depression.1

Symptoms And Effects of PTSD

  • Involuntary reliving a traumatic memory (also called flashbacks) along with physical symptoms such as increased heart rate or perspiration.2
  • Disturbing dreams or nightmares.
  • Intrusive thoughts that come without warning.
  • Avoiding regular situations and places that are connected to a traumatic memory or experience.2
  • Changes in mood and behavior such as hopelessness; feelings of low self-worth, emotionally numbness, blaming oneself (others) for events out of the realm of control and anger, and guilt over past actions.1
  • Being constantly on edge or at a heightened state of alert making it difficult to relax around others or have healthy sustained sleep.1

Also Read: How to deal with depression and anxiety

 

  1. PTSD Is More Common Than You May Think 

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, over 8 million American adults struggle with PTSD.3 Women are also more likely than men to have PTSD and by race, PTSD disproportionately effects Latin, African American, and Native populations.1,4

  1. There Is More Than One Type of PTSD 

Not everyone who suffers from PTSD does so in the same way. Understanding the type of post-traumatic stress disorder of the patient, allows practitioners to develop more effective treatment plans. Here some examples of the different types of PTSD:

Acute Stress Disorder 

Like PTSD, acute stress disorder arises in response to experiencing a traumatic event or being in proximity to someone who has. Unlike PTSD, acute stress disorder generally lasts less than a month after the traumatic event occurs.5

Acute stress disorder is generally treated with a variety of psychotherapies. If left unchecked acute stress disorder can escalate into PTSD.5

Uncomplicated PTSD 

Uncomplicated PSTD is the most common form. It usually arises from a single traumatic event and has symptoms that are less prevalent than complicated PTSD.

Complicated PTSD 

This type of PTSD arises from repeated exposure to traumatic events. Those with complicated PTSD experience flashbacks more often and are more likely have negative opinions about themselves.6

Comorbid PTSD 

The presence of PTSD with at least one other comorbid psychiatric disorder. These may include anxiety disorders, depression, and addiction.

  1. PTSD Therapy Has 3 Main Goals7 
  • Treat symptoms by bringing them to a manageable level.
  • Give patients the skills to effectively manage their trauma.
  • Help the person restore their sense of self-worth and improve their outlook on life.
  1. You Will Learn to Face Your Trauma Head On 

In exposure therapy, people with PTSD learn to process their trauma through confrontation. One of the most effective methods for this is exposure.

Different types of exposure used in PTSD treatment include imaginal exposure or discussing, and working through the traumatic events in a therapeutic setting or in vivo exposure. Vivo exposure involves confronting triggering situation either out in the world or by simulating it, when it is considered safe and beneficial to do so.8

  1. You May Be Prescribed Medication 

While medication may not be necessary for everyone, when used alongside psychotherapy it can greatly benefit treatment.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRI’s] and selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors [SNRI’s] have shown to be the most effective medications at treating PTSD symptoms.9

  1. Therapies For PTSD Are Evidence Based 

Suffering with PTSD can be overwhelming and even feel even hopeless at times. Fortunately, there are several therapeutic methods deemed to be effective at treating PTSD.

In a joint study with the Veterans Health Administration, the Department of Defense (VA/DoD) and the American Psychological Association [APA], Cognitive Processing Therapy [CPT], Cognitive Behavioral Therapy [CBT] and Prolonged Exposure Therapy [PE] were determined to be the most effective treatments for PTSD.10

  1. Learning To Manage Triggers is Key 

Those with PTSD often deal with sudden emotional shifts. These experiences can be brought on by the most subtle of triggers.

Unfortunately, this also means those with PSTD can become distrustful and even fearful of people, places and situations that can trigger unwanted memories.

To help patients regain a sense of security, PTSD therapy trains them to identify triggering experiences and develop coping strategies to deal with them.

  1. One On One Treatment Will Help You Change Your Mind 

Centered around trauma are the thought patterns that keep people with PTSD stuck in negative emotions. Continually living with trauma, they can develop distorted thoughts.

“The outside world as a dangerous place”, “It was my fault that this happened to me” and “I don’t deserve to get better”. These are all harmful thought patterns which can be reframed by working individually with a therapist.

  1. Group Therapy Can Also Be Beneficial 

Group therapy for treating PTSD goes back to World War 2 and was used to help soldiers coming back from the from lines.

Today, group therapy has been shown to treat a variety of traumas including sexual abuse in childhood, trauma stemming from war, refugee displacement, and sexual violence.11 

  1. The PTSD Therapy Timeline 

While no two cases are the same, studies indicate 15-20 sessions can provide recovery for 50 percent of patients.12 In cases of comorbid disorders such as addiction, however, longer treatment (a year or more) may be necessary.12 

Conclusion – Treating PTSD And Addiction 

Today we discussed how PTSD works and discussed the symptoms and differences between the different types of the disorder. We also covered the purpose and goals of therapy and how it can help patients to manage their triggers and gain control of their thinking. We also briefly covered the effectiveness of PTSD therapy and timeline for treatment.

One significant speedbump for the treatment of PTSD is co-occurring illnesses, most notably substance use disorder. According to one study, nearly half of individuals with lifetime PTSD also have substance use disorder.13 For these individuals, it is imperative that they find an addiction treatment program that will help them treat their addiction, while also providing them with therapeutic options to treat their PTSD.

Get Help with Addiction Today

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Are you or a loved one struggle with substance abuse? At All American Detox Center, we specialize in helping you through the earliest stages of recovery. For more information about how our programs call us today at (844) 570 -1301.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Citations

What is posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)? Psychiatry.org – What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? (n.d.). Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://psychiatry.org/patients-families/ptsd/what-is-ptsd

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (n.d.). Post-traumatic stress disorder. National Institute of Mental Health. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd

PTSD Facts & Treatment: Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA. PTSD Facts & Treatment | Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA. (n.d.). Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/posttraumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/treatment-facts

Julia, N. (2022, August 9). Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) statistics: 2022 update. CFAH. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://cfah.org/ptsd-statistics/

Moore, M. (2021, May 24). Types of PTSD. Psych Central. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://psychcentral.com/ptsd/types-of-ptsd#acute-stress-disorder

YouTube. (2021, June 22). 6 hidden signs of Complex PTSD (CPTSD) | medcircle. YouTube. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44hqDT7NNHU

Durning, M. V. (2020, December 15). Treatment options for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Healthgrades. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.healthgrades.com/right-care/mental-health-and-behavior/treatment-options-for-post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd

Zoellner, L. A., Feeny, N. C., Bittinger, J. N., Bedard-Gilligan, M. A., Slagle, D. M., Post, L. M., & Chen, J. A. (2011). Teaching Trauma-Focused Exposure Therapy for PTSD: Critical Clinical Lessons for Novice Exposure Therapists. Psychological trauma : theory, research, practice and policy, 3(3), 300–308. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0024642

American Psychological Association. (n.d.). Medications for PTSD. American Psychological Association. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.apa.org/ptsd-guideline/treatments/medications

Watkins, L. E., Sprang, K. R., & Rothbaum, B. O. (2018). Treating PTSD: A Review of                            Evidence-Based Psychotherapy Interventions. Frontiers in behavioral neuroscience, 12,                    258. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00258

 

Trauma/PTSD. (n.d.). Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.agpa.org/home/practice-resources/evidence-based-practice-in-group-psychotherapy/trauma-ptsd

American Psychological Association. (n.d.). How long will it take for treatment to work? American Psychological Association. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.apa.org/ptsd-guideline/patients-and-families/length-treatment 

Treatment of Co-Occurring PTSD and Substance Use Disorder in VA. (2017, May 15). Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/treat/cooccurring/tx_sud_va.asp