Difference Between Parenting and Mental Health Problems

Difference Between Parenting and Mental Health Problems - All American Detox

Parenting does not come with a rulebook that guides you to raise perfectly self-sufficient and mentally stable children. It is a trial and error process that plays the biggest role in your child’s life. Most of our parents did not grow up discussing mental health as a normal conversation. Mental health concerns and resources are far more accessible and normalized now than they ever have been. But what is the difference between parenting and mental health problems? Are parents to blame if their child develops severe anxiety or depression? How can you prevent this from happening?

Here we will cover:

  • What happens if parents have poor mental health
  • Parents mental health support
  • How children can be affected
  • Practical ways to help

What Happens if Parents Have Poor Mental Health?

Parents or primary caregivers are likely the people most involved in a child’s life. This means if a parent has poor mental health, their child will absolutely be affected in some way or another.

Poor mental health could mean:

  • Low self-esteem
  • Lack of motivation
  • Feeling sad or down
  • Excessive fear or worry
  • Excessive sleeping or insomnia
  • Social isolation
  • An inability to connect to others or the world we live in

Poor mental health can lead to severe anxiety, depression, untreated PTSD, or thoughts of self-harm or suicide. It can also lead to excessive alcohol or drug use. When parents have not been taught helping ways to cope with the stress and overwhelm life and parenthood brings, it can quickly turn into self-soothing through drugs or alcohol. This is problematic for nearly everyone involved in that person’s life, but especially their children.

As a parent, it is our main priority to ensure our children have their basic needs met. Are they fed, clean, hydrated, and supervised? But it is also our responsibility to make sure they feel loved, valued, adored, cared for, and important. So many of us grew up in emotional distant or physically distraught household environments. This can leave a child with years of emotional damage and greatly affect the way they show up in the world.

It was estimated that 10% of children ages 5-16 have a clinically diagnosed mental health problem and about 20% of adolescents may experience a mental health problem within any given year. But if parents work on healing themselves, and discussing mental health with their children, they can learn to support themselves in a healthy and fulfilling way to then teach this to their children.

Parent’s Mental Health Support

Seeking mental health support does not always come before the children and is an ongoing, never ending process. Therapy can be a helpful way to unload any personal baggage you may be carrying around. There are many different types of therapeutic modalities that can help you navigate and manage any sort of mental health problem.

Parents are often viewed as people who “have it all together.” Children look up to you, other parents may look up to you, and there is a lot of pressure to maintain that image. But parents need mental health support too. There are also tons of parenting support groups that may be able to connect you with other parents dealing with similar issues. The biggest thing to remember, is that while the healing work may be helping you better understand yourself, it is also helping the way you connect and show up for you child.

How Children can be Affected: Practical Ways to Help

When a parent or both parents are struggling with poor mental health, this becomes a risk factor for maltreatment. Parents who struggle with low self-esteem, lack of motivation, poor impulse control, antisocial behavior, high anxiety, or depression compromise their ability to properly care for their child. Children may be abused or neglected due to their parent or caregiver having untreated mental health issues. They may grow up with a lack of self-worth, trauma, feelings of being invisible or not important, or develop their own negative self-soothing practices such as substance abuse or self-harm.

If you are a parent dealing with mental health struggles, you are not alone. Parenting is one of the toughest roles you can take and while it may bring loads of joy and happiness, it can also bring up hardships and struggles. The good news is, there are practical ways to help yourself and your relationship with your child.

The most practical step you can take, is finding a local therapist that can help you understand and manage the symptoms of your mental health issues. There are plenty of therapist that accept insurances or offer a sliding scale-fee. There are also several online therapy services offered at a low cost. Therapy can be an intimidating and daunting experience, but it is available to help you let go of what has been holding you back and find self-soothing techniques to alleviate some of the discomfort caused by your poor mental health.

Other practical ways to help include:

  • Exercise
  • Mindfulness practices such as meditation or journaling
  • Reading self-help books, specifically focused on the mental health issue you may be experiencing
  • Breathwork exercises to help calm your nervous system
  • Spending time with others
  • Talking to a trusted friend about your struggles

Get Help

A child’s mental health is supported by their parents. Children learn from the environment they are living in. They can feel the energy within the room even before they are capable of expressing their thoughts or feelings. This is why it is so important for a parent to get help if they are struggling with poor mental health.

If you, or someone you know is struggling with alcohol or substance abuse, All American Detox Center is here for you. All American Detox Center provides clinical support to those who may be battling with an addiction. Please call (844) 570-1301 today to get the help you need and deserve.

Also Read: How to deal with depression and anxiety

Treatment Options for Drug & Alcohol Abuse at All American Detox

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Are you finally ready to quit drugs and alcohol once and for all? All American Detox is a drug and alcohol treatment and rehab center in Los Angeles California. Our detox and residential inpatient programs can help you overcome substance abuse in comfort and with confidence. For more information, call us today at (844) 570-1301.

Citations

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). “Warning Signs and Symptoms.”

https://www.nami.org/About-Mental-Illness/Warning-Signs-and-Symptoms.

Mental Health Foundation. “Children and Young People Statistics.”

https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/explore-mental-health/statistics/children-young-people-

statistics

Child Welfare Information Gateway. “Mental Health of Parents and Caregivers.”

https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/can/factors/parentcaregiver/mentalhealth/#:~:text=A

%20parent%27s%20or%20caregiver%27s%20mental,these%20factors%20can%20comp

romise%20parenting.

BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services. “10 Tips to Booth Your Mental Health.”

http://www.bcmhsus.ca/about/news-stories/stories/10-tips-to-boost-your-mental-health Retreived October 4, 2018.

10 Damaging Effects That Children of Alcoholics May Endure

10 Damaging Effects That Children of Alcoholics May Endure

The impacts of addiction on children are complex and far reaching. During this crucial age, children need to feel safe and secure–they also require love, understanding and guidance. And because children are still developing, they also must rely on their guardians for material needs like food, water and shelter.

Creating such an environment fosters growth and empowers children preparing them for life’s challenges. A parent who grappling with alcoholism, on the other hand may be neglectful, abusive or dangerous.

Alcoholism is also a progressive disease that gets worse over time, and even if things are okay for now there is no such thing as a functional alcoholic.

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction it is important to consider the impact that drinking could be having on your kids. While alcohol addiction can be a hard habit to kick, getting treatment as early as possible is the best way to minimize harm for the whole family

Read on to learn the 10 potential consequences children can face as a result of parental alcoholism.

Developmentally – In the Womb

Alcoholism can impact a child before they are even born, in utero. Alcohol enters the bloodstream, easily passing to the uterus where it is absorbed more slowly. In its vulnerable state, a fetus can endure permanent developmental changes to the body and brain.

Also Read: How to deal with depression and anxiety

1. Physical Development

  • Facial deformities such as cleft lip or palate: a gap (or gaps) that form on the upper lip or roof of the mouth.1
  • Premature birth and low birthweight
  • Hearing and vision loss
  • Small head size
  • Stunted height

2. Stunted Brain Development

The scanned brains of children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) reveal smaller brains as well as malformation in several areas of the brain. Other research found that prenatal poor communication between several parts of the brain.2 Together, the developmental issues associated with prenatal alcohol results in cognitive issues that can persist into adulthood.

3. Problems With Learning and Attention3

  • Memory problems
  • Issues with motor control and coordination
  • Speech impediments and problems with language development
  • Trouble paying attention
  • Poor critical thinking skills

4. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS)

Drugs including alcohol, opioids, amphetamine, cocaine and can lead to what is called neonatal abstinence syndrome or NAS: a condition where a baby is born dependent to the drug that the mother was taking.4

NAS can cause a variety of withdrawal symptoms many of which may complicate the pregnancy putting the baby’s health and life at risk.

Disruption of Childhood Development

5. Neglect

In cases where child maltreatment has occurred, 40% involve alcohol and drug use. This amounts to around 480,000 kids annually.5

Child neglect is the failure of a parent or guardian to secure a child’s fundamental needs including:

  • Physical Neglect: This includes securing material needs like clothing, food, shelter, or keeping them safe from harm.6
  • Educational Neglect: Not enrolling their children in school or pulling them out too often are examples of emotional neglect.6
  • Emotional Neglect: Ignoring, humiliating, or berating, intimidating the child or separating them from others.6
  • Medical neglect: Not providing proper medical care for a child or refusing recommended and necessary care from a doctor.6

6. Physical Abuse 

Psychical child abuse is the second most reported form of child abuse next to neglect; it includes any physical injury intended to cause harm.

Common forms of child abuse include:

  • Hitting or beating (either with bare hands, or an object like a belt or a stick)
  • Using objects like a stove or a lighter to burn the skin
  • Kicking
  • Suffocation by strangulation of holding a child underwater (even temporarily)
  • Restraining using rope or tape.7

Alcoholism is believed to contribute to child abuse for several reasons:

  • Heavily alcohol use can impair areas of the brain responsible for self-control, giving rise to violent behavior against children.8
  • Heavy alcohol abuse causes the abuser to miss social cues and mistakenly assume that family members are treating them with hostility or disrespect; it may also cause them to misjudge the severity of their actions.9
  • Child abusers who are alcoholics are more likely to perpetrate violence if they can place the blame on alcohol instead of holding themselves accountable.9

7. Sexual Abuse

Among both boys and girls, alcohol was found to be a risk factor in child sexual abuse or CSA; it was also found to be more common in families where alcoholism is or had been present.9 For women, alcoholism is also a risk factor for developing alcohol and substance abuse problems later in life.10

8. Emotional Abuse

In many cases, the impact of emotional or verbal abuse are just as damaging as physical abuse. And like physical abuse can be exacerbated by alcohol misuse. Situations involving emotional abuse may include:

  • Verbal bullying
  • Yelling or screaming
  • Putting down for the child making mistakes
  • Isolating the child from friends or family
  • Ignoring or refusing to speak to the child
  • Gaslighting ­– invalidating an individual’s perception of reality; especially when it means denying the existence of physical or emotional abuse.

Alcoholism and child abuse can also occur in the other direction. In other words, children experiencing emotional and physical abuse are at risk of developing alcohol or substance abuse problems as adults.

9. Trauma and PTSD

The exposure of physical, sexual, or emotional abuse at the hands of a guardian or another adult are traumatic experiences. Trauma is also associated with the development of other mental illnesses like anxiety disorders, depression, PTSD, Borderline Personality disorder and substance abuse disorder.12

10. Substance Misuse and Addiction

Trauma leaves lasting scars which if left unaddressed can follow a child into adolescence and adulthood. Without the skills to cope, it is likely that they will develop other methods, one of which is self-medicating using alcohol or other drugs.

Having substance abuse issues is also more common amongst those with at least one other mental illness; over 18% of those who struggle with mental illness also have a substance use disorder.13 Having a co-occurring disorder can also complicate the recovery process often requiring more intensive and engaging forms of substance abuse treatment.

Brief about Post-child abuse14

  • 14% of children (1 in 7) experience neglect or abuse every year in the US.
  • 33% of children (1 in 3) who enter the foster care do so as a result of parental drug and alcohol abuse.
  • Child abuse is often thought of as just being intentional physical and emotional harm such as striking or bullying but it also includes neglect. Parents who fail to provide necessities like food, water, shelter, education, or medical care are also committing child abuse.
  • Child abuse is traumatic; children who experience it may develop feelings of guilt or shame, reoccurring memories and maladaptive thinking. Without proper mental health services, they can go on to develop mental illnesses including substance abuse.

Treatment Options for Drug & Alcohol Abuse at All American Detox

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Are you finally ready to quit drugs and alcohol once and for all? All American Detox is a drug and alcohol treatment and rehab center in Los Angeles California. Our detox and residential inpatient programs can help you overcome substance abuse in comfort and with confidence. For more information, call us today at (844) 570-1301.

Citations

NHS. (n.d.). Overview -Cleft lip and palate. NHS choices. Retrieved October 4, 2022, from https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cleft-lip-and-palate/

Gadye, L. (n.d.). What is fetal alcohol syndrome, and how does it affect the brain? BrainFacts.org. Retrieved October 4, 2022, from https://www.brainfacts.org/diseases-and-disorders/childhood-disorders/2018/what-is-fetal-alcohol-syndrome,-and-how-does-it-affect-the-brain-082318

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, December 14). Alcohol use during pregnancy. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved October 4, 2022, from https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/fasd/alcohol-use.html

Default – Stanford Medicine Children’s health. Stanford Medicine Children’s Health – Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. (n.d.). Retrieved October 4, 2022, from https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=neonatal-abstinence-syndrome-90-P02387

The relationship between parental alcohol and other drug problems and … (n.d.). Retrieved October 5, 2022, from http://preventchildabuse.org/images/docs/therelationshipbetweenparentalalcoholandotherdrugproblemsandchildmaltreatment.pdf

Neglect. NSPCC. (n.d.). Retrieved October 4, 2022, from https://www.nspcc.org.uk/what-is-child-abuse/types-of-abuse/neglect/

U.S. National Library of Medicine. (n.d.). Child physical abuse: Medlineplus medical encyclopedia. MedlinePlus. Retrieved October 4, 2022, from https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001552.htm

Gouvernement du Canada. (2012, July 26). WHO Facts on Alcohol and Violence: Child maltreatment and alcohol. Canada.ca. Retrieved October 4, 2022, from https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/health-promotion/stop-family-violence/prevention-resource-centre/children/who-facts-on-alcohol-violence-child-maltreatment-alcohol.html

Widom, C. S., & Hiller-Sturmhöfel, S. (n.d.). Alcohol abuse as a risk factor for and consequence of child abuse. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Retrieved October 4, 2022, from https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh25-1/52-57.htm

Martie L. Skinner, Allison N. Kristman-Valente, Todd I. Herrenkohl, Adult Binge Drinking: Childhood Sexual Abuse, Gender and the Role of Adolescent Alcohol-Related Experiences, Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 51, Issue 2, 1 March 2016, Pages 136–141, https://doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agv093

Trauma. Mental Health Foundation. (n.d.). Retrieved October 4, 2022, from https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/explore-mental-health/a-z-topics/trauma#:~:text=Trauma%20can%20make%20you%20more,difficulties%20in%20your%20daily%20life.

Russ, S. (2020, April 29). One in three children entered foster care in 2017 because of parental drug abuse. Child Trends. Retrieved October 4, 2022, from https://www.childtrends.org/blog/one-in-three-children-entered-foster-care-in-fy-2017-because-of-parental-drug-abuse

How Long Does Cocaine Addiction Treatment Recovery Take?

How Long Does Cocaine Addiction Treatment Recovery Take?

Cocaine use has taken a serious toll on the health of Americans. In 2018, a national survey found that almost 1 million Americans meet the criteria for cocaine use disorder. Since that time, cocaine use has been on the rise–wreaking havoc in American communities and increasing deaths by overdose.

If you or a loved one is thinking about getting treatment for cocaine use disorder (CUD), determining what kind of treatments you need and how long they will take are primary concerns.

If you have spent time on addiction forums, you may have seen phrases like “inpatient”, “detox” or “residential inpatient treatment” being thrown around and wondered how these terms fit into addiction recovery. Today we will be discussing the timeline for cocaine addiction, recovery as well as providing you with useful information about addiction treatment programs for cocaine abuse and addiction.

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Cocaine addiction treatment

Addiction treatment for people with cocaine use disorder and other drug addictions is designed to address the needs of individuals as they continue their journey on the path towards recovery. People who first enter addiction treatment, might attend a drug detox program or go straight to an inpatient or an intensive outpatient program depending on what best fits their overall needs.

After the intensive phase of addiction treatment ends, addiction recovery for cocaine use continues. Many people find that a weekly outpatient program, joining a 12-step program, or attending some other weekly addiction counseling group helps to keep sobriety in perspective.

Cocaine Detox

Before the bulk of treatment can begin, it is important for the body to readjust to being without the drug. In medical detox, a person is evaluated to determine their physical and psychological condition. This helps to determine any potential complications to detox treatment early on.

In medical detox, trained staff are available 24/7 to consistently monitor the patient’s condition, keep them hydrated, nourished, and comfortable as the body experiences a range of cocaine withdrawal symptoms.

Cocaine detox, despite being less physically intense than other abused substances, has some caveats.

  • There are currently no FDA-approved medications used for cocaine withdrawal.
  • Cocaine users often abuse other substances like alcohol or marijuana, sometimes in the same setting.
  • Initial withdrawal symptoms appear in the form of a crash whereby a person experiences extreme exhaustion.
  • Acute (or severe) withdrawal symptoms for cocaine users typically last 5-7 days.
  • People who abuse drugs commonly also have mental health conditions. These co-occurring disorders can cause additional discomfort and increase the likelihood of relapse as a post-treatment outcome.
  • Once these more severe symptoms have subsided, the individual experiences less severe post-acute withdrawals symptoms or PAWS.

Inpatient Rehabilitation for Cocaine Addiction

At a residential inpatient treatment center, patients live in a 24/7 medically managed facility usually for 1-3 months. While in treatment clients have access to:

  • Individually tailored treatment plans
  • A safe relapse-free environment
  • Set treatment end dates
  • Medication management services
  • Group and individual counseling (including 12-step and other alternative counseling programs)
  • Evidence-based therapies have been shown to improve recovery outcomes
  • Recreational and Holistic therapies (such as art therapy, yoga, and meditation)
  • Access to recreational areas (gyms, pools, and tennis courts)

After completing an inpatient cocaine detox program, patients are encouraged to step down to either a partial hospitalization or intensive outpatient program.

Sometimes if a person has financial constraints or does not need an intensive program, they may opt for a regular outpatient program. These programs can provide greater flexibility and a lower weekly commitment.

How Long Does Cocaine Recovery Take?

In the early stages of addiction treatment, programs have set start and end dates. Because of this, people tend to associate the end of recovery with the end of their rehabilitation program. This, however, is not the case.

Life can present challenges that put people at low points. When things are going well, sobriety is easier to manage. When it isn’t, self-doubt can find its way in. This by no means suggests that sobriety is unattainable, but rather that recovery takes a lifetime of commitment.

Rather than seeing recovery as the endpoint of addiction treatment and relapse as a failure to change or succeed, we are instead encouraged to view recovery as a life-long journey and commitment to avoid the self-sabotaging behavior of drug abuse.

Get Help Today with Overcoming Cocaine Addiction

If you or a loved one are looking for an addiction rehab or detox program for substances All American Detox Center is here for you. Call addiction helpline number. We are an accredited addiction recovery center serving Los Angeles County, California.

The Benefits of Family Therapy for Drug Addiction

Family Therapy for Substance Abuse

If you or a loved one is considering addiction treatment, you may already be familiar with group and individual counseling. But what about other forms of therapy? In this article, we will discuss what family therapy is and who benefits from it in an addiction context.

What is family therapy?

Family therapy emerged from psychotherapy in the early 1960s. But unlike psychotherapy, which focuses on resolving issues with the individual, a family therapist looks at how one or more individuals function, resolve conflicts and communicate within the context of their family unit.

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Who Benefits from Family Therapy

Family therapy shows remarkable flexibility in treating disfunction. Family units such as couples, parents with adolescent children, and even less conventional types of family units can benefit from this type of therapy.

In recent decades, many families deviate from the nuclear family norm. A practitioner may work with a family where some or all its members are unrelated. In another situation, cousins, grandparents, or siblings may play more dominant and important roles than is typical. And regardless of who comprises a family system, its members live and develop interdependently.

The Family as a Whole

Addiction is considered by many to be a family disease, and this is for many reasons. One reason is that addiction susceptibility can be inherited genetically. Also, when families succumb to addiction, it is more likely for an environment that perpetuates substance abuse across generations to be created.

The Family of The Addicted Person

If you have somebody in your family who has a substance use disorder (SUD) you are probably experiencing a range of emotions. In the throes of addiction, it is not uncommon for your loved one to engage in life-threatening behaviors, endanger others, become hostile and withdraw from family responsibilities. These behavioral issues can cause additional stress and even rifts in the relationship and may need to be resolved with family counseling.

The Person with an Addiction

A person with an addiction may resort to drug use in part to cope with the dysfunction in their family. They may feel, misunderstood, unloved, or stigmatized by family members. When treatment is underway, this loss of critical support can lead to negative outcomes and prolonged family dysfunction can worsen mental health problems like depression and anxiety.

Family therapy offers a way to address concerns on behalf of the patient, which can give them a more positive outlook towards the recovery process. This positively seems to be an important predictor of successful treatment. As one study noted, alcoholics who received family therapy were more likely to enroll in drug detox center and experience positive outcomes than those who did not.

If you are currently in addiction treatment, you may feel isolated or disconnected from your regular life. Family therapy provides a way for loved ones to be more visible and involved in addiction treatment which in many cases benefits the patient.

What are the Goals of Family Therapy?

During a family therapy session, the practitioner will interview and moderate family discussions in order to get a better understanding of how the family unit functions and determine what it does well and what problem areas need to be addressed. Specific goals include:

  • Solving disputes within a family
  • Improving honest engagement
  • Establish boundaries
  • Help families engage in healthy communication
  • Foster compassion and understanding between family members
  • Help individuals develop a greater awareness of family dynamics.

 

effect of addiction on family

How Family Therapy Works with Addiction Treatment

In the interest of getting everybody on the same page, it is important to educate family members on the realities of addiction.

Family members will need to adjust to understanding addiction is a disease so that they may develop realistic expectations for treatment. Addiction is the result of numerous factors, such as genetics, trauma, mental health, and others but its outcome strips away an individual’s ability to stop using.

Taking steps like these is important for developing empathy and helpful dialogue around the subject of addiction. As family members are often subjected to stress and negative experiences it’s important to channel that into healthy, productive discussion and refrain from blaming and shaming.

If you are the one in addiction treatment, education could mean learning about how attachment styles, mental wellbeing is deeply dependent on how your family functions. This newfound awareness can then be translated to solutions, like the development of boundaries, assertiveness, the development of independence and empowerment.

Where is it Offered?

As previously mentioned, family therapy has proven to be flexible in its ability to treat issues within family systems, but it is also favored for its ability to be purposed in a variety of treatment settings such as:

What Approach is Right for Me?

Family Systems Therapy

Treats individuals based on their role in a larger family system. Because families share a collective history, the behavior and sense of identity that makes one feel unique are interconnected and dependent on the other members.

In addiction treatment, a family systems counselor might help you to recognize how a person’s drug usage is tied to dysfunctional patterns of communication and help them develop tools to increase mindfulness, create healthy boundaries, and promote healthy communication with loved ones.

Family Behavior Therapy (FBT)

An approach suitable for both and adults and adolescents. In this approach, patients work with their family and a therapist to develop behavioral goals. Upon meeting these goals, they are rewarded with a reinforcer or something that encourages them to continue the behavior. For example, parents might reward adolescents for remaining sober or for increasing their school attendance.

Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT)

Typically lasting only 3 months split into 12-15 sessions, BSFT is an effective intervention treatment for parents with adolescents who are struggling with substance abuse and other behavioral issues. In this short but effective treatment, the therapist builds a relationship with each member of the family and learns their motives and concerns. Once this phase is completed, and mediation is underway, an action plan is developed to treat the issues and maximize the family’s overall health.

If you or a loved one is interested in learning more about addiction treatment options in the Southern California area– look no further. All American Detox offers premier detox and residential inpatient treatment. For more information, please contact us at the de-addiction helpline number

 

Cocaine Addiction Statistics: How Dangerous Is It?

Cocaine Statistics: How Dangerous Is It?

Classed as a schedule II drug by the government, that alone should paint a stark picture of just how hazardous cocaine is. For those not well versed in drug scheduling, II is defined as, “drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous”. Cocaine Addiction

While there are medical uses for it, one being as a topical anesthetic, when used as recreational drug cocaine leads to disastrous effects.

It’s a powerfully addictive stimulant that works by flooding the brain with dopamine and providing a fleetingly brief euphoric high. The fact that it lasts a short time leads people to use it again to achieve hit those same levels of dopamine eventually leading to building up a tolerance which can quickly turn into an addiction.

If you’re struggling with cocaine addiction or know someone who is, reach out to us at All American Detox, and let’s get you the help you need.

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History of Cocaine

Oddly enough, cocaine has technically been in use for millennia. The indigenous people of South America have been ingesting and chewing on coca leaves, Erythroxylon coca being the source of cocaine, for thousands of years because of their stimulant effects.

It’s essentially one of the oldest known natural stimulants and it wasn’t until the mid-19th century that a German chemist, Albert Nieman, isolated cocaine from those coca leaves.

Famed neurologist and founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, thought cocaine to be a miracle drug and published a paper on it called “Über Coca”. What he was less aware of at the time were the addictive properties of the drug and thus ended up with addiction.

In that same era, in 1886, a drink invented by John Pemberton was just hitting the soda fountains and eventually the stores. A cocaine-infused beverage known as Coca-Cola with the cocaine itself was removed in 1903.

The 1914 Harrison Narcotics Tax Act heavily regulated cocaine and opiate products and things remained relatively quiet until the explosion of cocaine/crack cocaine in the ’70s and ’80s. From that high watermark, usage has declined quite a bit.

Cocaine Use Statistics in America

While usage is down, it’s by no means under control or at an acceptable level.

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health in 2014, about 913,000 Americans met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for dependence or abuse of cocaine (in any form) during the past 12 months.

Additionally, over 1 in 3 drug misuse or abuse-related emergency department visits involved cocaine.

A 2018 study showed that by far the highest use prevalence for the drug is among those in the 18 to 25 year old demographic with 5.8% saying they’ve used in the past year.

Disconcertingly, 2.2% of high school seniors say they’ve used cocaine in the last year, and with roughly 3.7 million high school seniors in America, that works out to about 81,400 that have used cocaine.

Read about:  How Long Does Cocaine Addiction Treatment Recovery Take?

How to Get Help with A Cocaine Addiction

Getting help with cocaine addiction is easier now than ever before and will hopefully get even easier as the stigma associated with addiction fades.

All treatment programs start with detox (for the most part), treating the mind and the mental aspects of addiction can’t be done in any robust way until the drug, aka toxin, is out of your body completely. From there you’d either enter an inpatient treatment program where a team of licensed professionals would develop an evidence-based program tailored to your needs.

Inpatient care focuses on counseling and group therapy to help you work through what led you to addiction and also to lay the groundwork for a life of sobriety. To equip you with the tools you need to overcome cravings and distractions and stick with recovery long term.

 After that, you’d be on your way to outpatient care, a stripped-back version of inpatient care that doesn’t require a long stay, and then transitioning back to your day-to-day by way of aftercare or a sober living home. Whichever suits you best.

 

What Is the Definition of Addiction?

What Is the Definition of Addiction?

It’s stigmatizing. It’s a struggle. It’s helplessness. It can seem perversely fun. It’s the illusion of control. It’s destructive. It’s deceptive. It’s painful. It’s euphoric. It’s devastating. It’s life-shattering. And it’s certainly treatable. Learn here about drug addiction!

How Do You Define Addiction? 

So, how do you define addiction? While addiction comes in many forms, the American Psychiatric Association does a great job of defining it concisely: “Addiction is a complex condition, a brain disease that is manifested by compulsive substance use disorder despite harmful consequences”.

The effects of substance abuse and addictive behavior eventually manifest in a dancing plethora of adverse ways, a few of those, according to Healthline, being:

  • A lack of self-control
  • Increased reliance on the substance 
  • Emotional numbness

What starts maybe innocently as a way to feel better or from curiosity, snowballs into one of those, you-just-can’t-help-yourself vibes, and it continues ad nauseum until you reach a breaking point. The proverbial rock bottom.

But does it happen to everyone?

What is Drug Addiction?

Addiction is a disorder of the brain and behavior. When you’re hooked to drugs, you can’t stop yourself from using them, no matter how dangerous they are. The sooner you seek treatment for drug addiction, the more likely you are to prevent some of the disease’s more serious consequences.

Drug addiction can begin with the occasional use of a recreational drug in social situations, and for some people, the drug usage progresses to more frequent use. Others, particularly those addicted to opioids, develop a drug addiction after being exposed to prescription drugs or acquiring medications from a friend or relative who has been given the medication. The risk of addiction and the rate at which you get hooked differs depending on the drug. Some medicines, such as opioid pain relievers, have a higher risk of addiction and induce it more quickly than others.

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Drug addiction is not limited to heroin, cocaine, or other illicit narcotics. Alcohol, nicotine, sleep and anti-anxiety drugs, and other legal substances can all lead to addiction.

Why Addiction Effects Some People and Not Others

Drug addiction is defined as a complex condition and brain disease. Addiction is not a fate that befalls all, which honestly is great, so let’s take a moment to acknowledge that fact. That said, it is something that can touch everyone in one way or another. It’s not as if we’re separated out and sorted into static columns of “addict” and “addiction-free” at birth. Like the fluidity with which our lives move, so too does addiction.

There are a handful of big-time considerations for why the scourge of substance abuse affects some of us and not others, the National Institute of Health does a great job boiling it down:

  • Biology – The risk of addiction is 40 to 60% related to genetics, which is wild. Gender, ethnicity, and existing mental disorders all can be factors that increase risk.
  • Environment – This is perhaps the most visible factor. Things related to your neighborhood, home life, family, and socioeconomic standing. All these things play an enormous role when combined with the peer pressure many kids and even adults face.
  • How the substance is taken – Simply put, smoking or injecting increases the potential for addiction drugs.

It’s a bit nature and a bit nurture and ultimately recognizing that each person’s situation is unique is important in forging a road to recovery they can confidently, and successfully, travel down.

How to Treat Addiction

It’s not an easy task but luckily there are many approaches to suit the varied needs of those suffering from addiction. Often the first thing that happens is an acknowledgment of their addiction and the struggle, or impossibility, to cope with it personally and internally. That’s how it all starts for us at All American Detox, we help anyone who reaches out and asks for help.

After that momentous leap, a huge component to getting on the straight and narrow is drug detoxification, i.e. the act of removing toxic substances from your body through physiological and medicinal practices. Our program is a way to safely get you off the drugs or alcohol and back in the driver’s seat of your life.

Defining Addiction at All American Detox

Depending on the individual situation, inpatient treatment may be the best way to go. We create a welcoming environment, with loads of amenities and surrounded by a team of medical and psychiatric professionals, to keep you comfortable while you get yourself clean.

As important as it is to get clean and on the right track, doing it in a bubble at a center like ours isn’t quite the same as real life. We know that. Because of that, we offer robust outpatient and aftercare to help adjust to sober living on the outside. It’s essentially the same treatment we offer at a facility but at a scaled-back level. Think of it as us holding your hand through the transition.

Yet another element of the treatment ecosystem is sober living, more or less a stripped-down version of inpatient treatment. Folks can come and go as they please, get back into and resume normal life while having a safe space to come back to as they really cement those newly formed healthy habits.

Addiction doesn’t have to be a life sentence and at the All American Detox Center, we are here to help people find a path to lasting recovery once and for all. Call us today to learn more about our drug alcohol detoxification program!